The diabetic diet

Monitoring of lipids, blood pressure and body weight is crucial.

Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) and daily monitoring of blood glucose are standard tools to measure glucose control.

For individuals with Type 1 diabetes, self-monitoring 4 times daily or more is recommended to maintain near-normal blood glucose levels and gain control.  Testing 4 times a day, before each meal, and at bedtime, facilitates adjustments to insulin, meals, and exercise program. 

For individuals with Type 2 diabetes, self-monitoring 1-2 times daily or more is recommended to avoid hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia symptoms.   

Newly diagnosed individuals should test blood glucose 4 times a day, before each meal, and at bedtime, or more is recommended to maintain near-normal blood glucose levels and gain control.  Testing   facilitates adjustments to insulin, meals, and exercise program. 

After a stable pattern has been established in blood glucose levels, individuals should test before breakfast, 3-7 times each week.  Once or twice each month you should return to testing 4 times a day (before each meal, and at bedtime) to assure maintenance of a stable pattern.

NO CONCENTRATED SWEETS, LOW FAT DIET.

(LOW SUGAR-LOW FAT)

Purpose: The no concentrated sweets, low fat diet is designed to limit the total amount of fat and sugar in the diet to reduce serum lipid levels and to achieve and maintain near normal blood glucose levels. This diet is for people who find the exchange system too confusing or restricting to follow.

Use: It is used for the person with either non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or for people who need or want to cut down on their sugar and fat intake. The calorie-controlled diet may be adapted for weight reduction and weight maintenance for individuals that do not have diabetes. It is also used for persons with elevated serum cholesterol levels or those who are high-risk candidates for heart disease.

General Guidelines.

Limit total fat intake to less than 30% of totaldaily calories.

Reduce saturated fat intake (red meat, cheese, whole milk, butter, ice cream, etc.)

Eat less trans fat (stick margarine, shortening, cakes, pies, French fries, snack chips.)

Eat less cholesterol (limit egg yolks to more than 4 per week and meat, fish, poultry to no more than 6 ounces a day)

Reduce sugar intake.

Eat more fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grain breads, and cereals.

Maintain a healthy weight.

Exercise at least 30 minutes on most days (brisk walking, aerobics, biking, etc.)

Experiment with recipes by gradually reducing the amount of sugar by 1/4th then l/3rd then 1/2.

Use the "sweet" spices—cinnamon cloves ginger or nutmeg—to bring out sweetness in baked goods.

Be careful when using special diet or dietetic foods such as dietetic cake, cookies, candy and ice cream. These foods contain some form of sweetener and, therefore, calories.

NO CONCENTRATED SWEET FOOD LIST.

Purpose: The no concentrated sweets diet is designed to achieve and maintain near normal blood glucose levels, and reduce associated symptoms of diabetes in order to minimize the complications frequently associated with this disease. This diet is for people who find the exchange system too confusing or restricting to follow.

Use: It is used for the person with either non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus or for people who need or want to cut down on their sugar intake. It is not intended for the person with diabetes taking insulin. The calorie-controlled diet may be adapted for weight reduction and weight maintenance.

Eat three meals at regular times. Do not skip meals.

Limit total fat intake to less than 30% of totaldaily calories.

Reduce saturated fat intake (red meat, cheese, whole milk, butter, ice cream, etc.)

Eat less trans fat (stick margarine, shortening, cakes, pies, french fries, snack chips.)

Eat less cholesterol (limit egg yolks to more than 4 per week and meat, fish, poultry to no more than 6 ounces a day.)

Reduce salt intake (canned and dried soups, fast food, frozen dinners, pizza, processed meats and cheese.)

Eat more fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grain breads, and cereals.

Maintain a healthy weight. Mild to moderate weight loss (10-20 lbs. has been shown to improve diabetes control, even if desirable body weight is not achieved.)